Great Health Care System, By Dr Digpal Chauhan – Book Review

Digpal Chauhan amasses an immeasurable amount of data and presents it excellently in his treatise publication Great Health Care System, “Portrait of Principles & Practice.”As much a primary tool for health care professionals as the PDR (Physician’s Desk Reference), Digpal Chauhan compresses an incomprehensively broad spectrum of data on the health care ecosystem and logically categorizes his work with a clever use of memorable acronyms. Digpal Chauhan modestly does not claim ownership for much of the intellectual property included in his book, as he uses extensive professional accreditations to those that have prior publications and copyrights of some of the material. He does, however have a breviloquent and agreeable presentation skill, thus his book pages as one would imagine attending his seminar.Simplicity is Digpal Chauhan’s goal. He quotes quite humorously, Albert Einstein, “Everything should be as simple as possible and no simpler.” However in the beauty of creating simplicity, Chauhan finds himself carving off unnecessary detail to reveal the brilliance of truth analogous to the “Mountain of Light,” the Kohinoor diamond. He achieves this brilliance as the reader realizes, page by page, they are reading the solution to the waste and mediocrity of our current health care system, the fundamental statistics of life and disease accumulated by the actuarial research professionals, as well as the summary of health care diagnosis and prognosis of many major chronic conditions. All of this in a mere 188 pages brings to light the brilliance of Digpal Chauhan’s book.For example, in discussing the underpinnings and professional responsibilities of health care professionals, there are the “10 Commandments” of the principles for medical staff personnel to follow:Acronym: “PRINCIPLES”
Professional competence
Responsibilities of medical profession
Improving quality of care to optimize outcomes
Nurturing relationship with patient (healing, therapeutic, & altruistic)
Care access improvement
Integrity of medical ethics
Privacy of patient welfare and confidentiality
Locus of patient autonomy and honesty with patient
Equity and social justice
Scientific knowledgeBy the use of scores of these acronyms throughout his book, Digpal Chauhan allows his readers to slow down to their own pace of absorbing the wisdom inherent in the articulation of each of these line items. Thus the book becomes a tool, combing the reader’s thoughts into a direction of clarity, while enabling a creative method for memorization of the incremental steps necessary to achieve the desired result.As with any healing process, a holistic approach is necessary, and Digpal Chauhan quotes Socrates, “Just as you ought not to attempt to cure eyes without head, or head without body, so you should not treat body without soul.” Although leaving off any religious or spiritual guidance from his book, the physical realm is clearly brought to focus, as Digpal Chauhan cares for the living and leaves the rest to a higher power.I feel the Great Health Care System is a book which should be required reading for all medical professionals, legislators dealing with the United States regulations, hospital management, health insurance professionals, and by those in the public wishing to gain an insider’s look into the core of our system of healing. Frankly, it brought to my own awareness the sobering statistics of certain medical conditions faced by me and by those in my life, as well as the actions that can be taken to minimize the associated health risks.

The Increasing Surge of Health Care

While sitting back in her blue jeans and wearing a heavy workout sweater at the Legacy Emanuel Hospital’s Emergency room, Angela Jones has her feet prompted up and crossed atop of a small table. When asked about health care issues and how they affect her, Angela explains that there is a portion of people who suffer from not having health care insurance. She makes it clear that some of those who suffer most are young people. Jones, who is a college student, declared her passion for the young because it falls under her own age group.Says Jones, “The Oregon Health Plan should be open to more people who are under 21 years old. Private insurance shouldn’t be so expensive for young people.”According to national surveys, the primary reason people are uninsured is the high cost of health insurance coverage. Notwithstanding, nearly one-quarter (23 percent) of the uninsured reported changing their way of life significantly in order to pay medical bills. Economists have discovered that increasing health care costs correlate to drops in health insurance coverage.Jones believes that some of the greatest challenges that people face across this nation is obtaining affordable health care. “I would open an Oregon Health Plan to a variety of people who don’t have insurance. It is hard to get health insurance.”Terri Heer, a registered nurse at a local hospital, claims that in order to improve America’s health care system a key ingredient is to “make sure that everyone (has) access.”This would include cutting out on expenses that are not palpable to so called “health care needs”. Heer says, “First, we spend a lot of money servicing people for illnesses that can be prevented. Some of the money spent can go to other things.”Over the long haul, should the nations health care system undergo significant changes, the typical patient may not necessarily see the improvements firsthand. “I would love to say there will be a lot of changes. I am not a pessimist, but I don’t think there will be any change,” says Heer. Heer does allude to the fact that if more money were spent for people in the health care arena, she says that there is a possibility that the necessary changes would be more evident.Whether health care is affordable or not is an issue that affects everyone. According to a recent study last year, health care spending in the United States reached $2.3 trillion, and is projected to reach $3 trillion by 2011. By 2016, it is projected to reach $4.2 trillion. Although it is estimated that nearly 47 million Americans are uninsured, the U.S. spends more on health care than any other nation.The rising tide of health care stems from several factors that has an affect on us all. First, there is an intensity of services in the U.S. health care system that has undergone a dramatic change when you consider that people are living longer coupled with greater chronic illnesses.Secondly, prescription drugs and technology have gone through significant changes. The fact that major drugs and technological advancement has been a contributing factor for the increase in health care spending. Some analysts suggest that the improvement of state-of-art technologies and drugs increase health care spending. This increase not only attributes to the high-tech inventions, but also because consumer demand for these products has gone through the roof, so to speak.Thirdly, there is an aging of the population. Since the baby boomers have reached their middle years, there is a tremendous need to take care of them. This trend will continue as baby boomers will qualify for more Medicare in 2011.Lastly, there is the factor of administrative costs. Some would argue that the private sector plays a critical role in the rise of health care costs and the economic increase they produce in overhead costs. At the same time, 7 percent of health care expenses are a result of administrative costs. This would include aspects of billing and marketing.Terra Lincoln is a woman who was found waiting in the Emergency room at the Providence Portland Medical Center. When asked about the rising costs of health care, she said, “If you don’t have medical coverage, it’ll cost you too much money. If I leave the hospital right now and I need to buy two (types) of medicines, I couldn’t afford it.” Lincoln says that she is a member of the OHP, but she believes that there are still issues that need to be addressed.Terra recognizes that to reduce medical costs, she would have to start by getting regular checkups. “Sometimes people of color wait till they’re in pain before they get a checkup,” she said.A national survey shows that the primary reason why people cannot afford health care is because of soaring costs of health care coverage. In a recent Wall-Street Journal-NBC survey it is reported that 50% of the American public claims that their highest and most significant economic concern is health care. Consequently, the rising cost of health care is the number one concern for Democratic voters.Regarding the rising tide of health care, Kristin Venderbush, a native Wisconsin, and another patient in emergency at Providence says, “I worry a lot about what happens to the working poor. They don’t have OHP. If you can’t advocate for yourself, you will not get the health care you need…on every level.”Harvard University researchers conducted a recent study that discovered that the out-of-pocket medical debt for an average consumer who filed bankruptcy was $12,000. This study noted that 68 percent of those who had filed for bankruptcy carried health insurance. Apparently, these bankruptcy’s were results from medical expenses. It was also noted in this study that every 30 seconds someone files for bankruptcy after they have had some type of serious health problem.In spite of all the social and economic bureaucracy in the health care arena, some changes were made in Washington on January 28, 2008. In his State of the Union address, President Bush made inquired Congress to eliminate the unfair bias of the tax code against people who do not get their health care from their employer. Millions would then have more options that were not previously available and health care would be more accessible for people who could not afford it.Consequently, the President believes that the Federal government can make health care more affordable and available for those who need it most. Some sources suggest that the President not only wants health care to be available for people, but also for patients and their private physicians so that they will be free to make choices as well. One of the main purposes for the health care agenda is to insure that consumers will not only have the freedom to make choices, but to also enable those to make decisions that will best meet their health care needs.Kerry Weems, Acting Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, oversees the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, also known as SCHIP. This is a critical program because it pays for the health care of more than six and a half million children who come from homes that cannot afford adequate health insurance. These homes exceed the pay scale for Medicaid programs, therefore are not able to participate.During SCHIP’s ten year span, states have used the program to assist families with low-income and uninsured children for their sense of well-being in the health care arena. The Bush Administration believes that states should do more of an effort to provide for the neediest children and enable them to get insurance immediately. The SCHIP was originally intended to cover children who had family incomes ranging from $20,650. This amount would typically include a family of four. According to sources, all states throughout the U.S. have SCHIP programs in place and just over six million children are served.Children and Health CareWashington’s PerspectiveWhat is driving health care costs?The fact that the U.S. faces ever increasing health care woes, has left many to believe that the country’s current crisis is on a lock-step path toward insolvability.

US Health Care Workers Benefit As Medical Scrubs Receive A High-Tech Makeover

There is no question that technology drives the health care industry. Advancements in equipment, drugs and research have paved the way for the elimination of many diseases and the quick and successful treatment of a variety of illnesses and injuries. In turn, we’re living longer than ever before and it’s safe to say we’ve come a long way since blood-letting.And yet with all these advancement’s, there is one glaringly low-tech component to the health care industry. One that impacts between 3 and 4 million health care workers, predominantly nurses, and is so synonymous with the medical profession that even a TV series was named after them.Medical scrubs, so named due to the scrubbing of hands prior to surgery, have been seen throughout hospitals, dental offices and veterinarian clinics for more than 60 years. Prior to the 1940’s most surgeons wore something akin to a butcher’s apron to protect their street clothes while nurses wore head to toe garments which were called “fever uniforms.”But as the industry became more aware of the need for clean, bacteria-free work environments, white “smocks” were introduced to emphasize cleanliness. However, with the bright lights and white walls of most hospitals eye strain became an issue and in the 1950’s and 60’s medical workers turned towards various shades of green to combat eye fatigue and make blood less conspicuous. By the 1970s, scrubs arrived at the design that is still common today: a short-sleeve V-necked shirt and drawstring pants. While most were made of cotton, polyester blends were also introduced.Yet over the past few decades the only real changes to scrubs have come in the way of color and print options and some minor design variations. But with a recent trustees report by the American Medical Association recommending research in to textile transmission of health-care associated infections, it seems clear that medical scrubs will need to move from their low-tech past in to a high-tech future.The past year or so has seen a few forward-thinking manufacturers releasing scrubs infused with antimicrobial technology. While the properties have yet to be developed to the point where all bacteria is killed on contact these early efforts are showing promise. At the very least, those choosing to wear these innovative scrubs are being provided with a host of benefits such as sweat, odor and stain resistance as well as temperature control. Until recently however, these properties would wash out of the garment in short order. But a Tennessee company has recently launched a scrubs line that has solved that problem with a product that is breaking new ground in the $750 million medical apparel industry.Performance Healthcare Products came to the scrubs industry via a line of sleepwear they developed specifically for women battling night sweats. CEO Kirby Best, who was first introduced to sweat-wicking materials as the former driver for the Canada 1 national bobsled team, began exploring how “smart materials” could be incorporated in to the health care industry.”When I first began looking in to the health care industry I was a little shocked to learn of the lack of innovation in the scrubs market,” said Best from his Nashville headquarters. “It just didn’t make much sense. And when we started surveying nurses about was important to them in their uniforms it seemed clear that there was some distance between what they wanted and what they had access to.”Working with one of the largest chemical and textile manufacturers in the world, the Spartanburg, South Carolina headquartered Milliken and Company, Best and his team focused their efforts on a creating a fabric that utilizes the naturally occurring element of silver to provide the long-lasting antimicrobial protection they were after. The application comes in the form of microscopic silver ions which are encased in engineered ceramic “cages” and then embedded into a soft yet durable, breathable fabric. Silver”We knew the technology was strong but the big question mark was if it would hold up,” said Best who was aware that other attempts at providing antimicrobial technology resulted in the active properties washing out quickly. “My team and I spent a lot of time in front of our washing machines.”After rigorous testing and convinced that the technology would be effective for the lifetime of the garment Best went to work on a design and turned to the logical resources to assist him. “I’m not a nurse. And for me to create a design would have been a mistake. For these scrubs to work they had to meet the demands of our audience. That was the whole point of launching a scrubs line. To give professional nurses something they both wanted and needed.”The resulting product was dubbed Performance Scrubs and it has created a new benchmark for ‘smart materials’ in the industry. Best also delivered on his goal to meet his audience’s demands by using recent textile innovations to meld softness with extraordinary durability, two important factors for nurses who are almost always responsible for purchasing and laundering their own scrubs. Performance is also the only scrubs company in the industry that does all their manufacturing in the United States which allows nurses to customize their scrubs with color, piping and design options.Next up for Best is developing a line of scrubs that kills many forms of airborne bacteria. With the American Medical Association reporting that infections spread within a hospital or health care setting are responsible for an estimated 1.7 million infections each year, of which approximately 100,000 of these cases resulting in death, there is an urgent need for additional protection to both the worker and the patient. And with an additional $20 billion cost to the health care industry to combat these infections each year there is certainly a financial incentive for the industry to explore new safety innovations.”We really weren’t aware of the depth of the problem when we began developing our product,” said Best. “But hopefully, the success of our line will lead others to look for ways to keep both workers and patients safe and protected. I mean, that’s the point of health care, isn’t it?